Haemophilia

Haemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder (this means it is genetically passed to the child through the parent’s gene) in which the blood does not clot properly. Majority of people with haemophilia are males, but there are females who are also affected. Blood contains many proteins (called clotting factors) that help stop bleeding. These clotting factors are numbered from 1 through 13, using Roman numerals (such as I or X). People with haemophilia have either a low level of these clotting factors in their blood or none at all. The lower the level—the more serious the haemophilia. This means sometimes bleeding without an obvious cause and/or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. There are 2 different types of haemophilia:

  • Haemophilia A (also known as classical haemophilia): this type is caused by a lack or decrease of clotting factor VIII (8)
  • Haemophilia B (also known as Christmas disease): this type is caused by a lack or decrease of clotting factor IX (9)
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